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Old 10-12-2019, 08:41 PM   #1
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Default Driver memory

After a couple of years unsuccessful looking for solutions for my problem, hope that Computerforums.org can help.


I have MSI laptop, GP72, 7RD Leopard, GTX 1050, Windows 10 64-bit, Intel Core i&-7700HQ CPU @ 2.80GHz, 8.0GB RAM, Intel HD Graphics 630.
Laptop itself working perfect, but have two serious problems:
1. My Windows (C is only 117GB and biggest part of memory is sitting on Data (D drive
2. Because of it I cannot update Windows because says not enough memory


All my programs are on C drive.


My question is: Is there possible to allocate memory from D to C drive without affecting any program and files because I don't want to reinstalling them yet again.
Please, is there any solution?
Cheers
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Old 10-12-2019, 09:09 PM   #2
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Default Re: Driver memory

Yes, you can resize the partitions. EaseUS offers a free trial that should do what you need.

Apparently Windows can do it as well. https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...windows-vista/
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Old 10-12-2019, 11:30 PM   #3
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Default Re: Driver memory

Quote:
Originally Posted by TrotterTech View Post
Yes, you can resize the partitions. EaseUS offers a free trial that should do what you need.

Apparently Windows can do it as well. https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...windows-vista/
Thanks buddy! I have full version of EseUS and will try following your instructions. I basically need to increase C: drive and decrease D: who occupies almost 1TB of space.
As I understood you answer I need to cut from D: drive and give to C:
Thanks once more.
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Old 10-13-2019, 04:51 AM   #4
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Default Re: Driver memory

It's slightly more complicated than that. You first need to shrink the D: partition to make room on the drive to increase the C: partition. That will leave room (unallocated disk space) on the far side of the D: partition. Then you will need to swap the D: partition with the unallocated space to make that space adjacent to the C: partition. Once you do that, you can then expand the C: partition into the unallocated space.
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Old 10-13-2019, 08:58 AM   #5
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Default Re: Driver memory

Are you sure the two partitions are actually of one physical storage unit? If they are not, you cannot extend the "C:" drive with the free space of "D:" drive. Not sure, but from the attached screenshot, they seem separate. I hope not, for your sake.

Make sure of it from the Disk Management section found in Computer Management window. You can get to Computer Management by pressing the Windows sigh button (next to Alt and Ctrl buttons on the keyboard) and typing "management". Search suggestions should show Computer Management on top at least in Windows 7.

If they are, you can do that without extra software. Extra software could give you more options, tho. Right there in Disk Management is one way to do it or look around the full version of EaseUS you have. You can then decide between the two methods as members kindly provided above.

If the two partitions turned out to be of separate physical storage units, you have the option of only replacing the "C:" drive with a bigger one, or clear some space. Are you sure stuff are managed well between the two drives? Maybe delete or push what's not OS critical from "C:" to "D:" ?
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Old 10-13-2019, 10:52 AM   #6
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Default Re: Driver memory

Try this method but as said these methods will only work if your D: is a partiton of your C: drive. If C and D are separate drives then there is nothing you can do to increase C: other than buy a bigger disk or swap your D and C disks around b ut this will require a re-install.
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Old 10-13-2019, 04:47 PM   #7
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Default Re: Driver memory

Will follow your instructions. I am graphic designer and not much know about programming. All I want is put extra Gb on my Windows C: drive without losing any data, programs etc. if I for example buy new HD of 1 or 2 TB can I just copy existing one to it or there’s need of formatting etc.
It’s annoying that can’t update Windows 10 because of not enough space when on drive D: sitting waste of almost 1 TB.

---------- Post added at 07:47 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:44 AM ----------

Thanks buddy will try with your suggestions.
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Old 10-13-2019, 06:34 PM   #8
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Default Re: Driver memory

[QUOTE=Radesign58;12198278]Will follow your instructions. I am graphic designer and not much know about programming. All I want is put extra Gb on my Windows C: drive without losing any data, programs etc. if I for example buy new HD of 1 or 2 TB can I just copy existing one to it or thereís need of formatting etc.
Itís annoying that canít update Windows 10 because of not enough space when on drive D: sitting waste of almost 1 TB.

---------- Post added at 07:47 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:44 AM ----------
Hi Smart_Guy

Here's snapshot of Disk Management. Have a look please and let me know what is situation.


Thanks for you time.
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File Type: jpg Disk Management.jpg (85.7 KB, 7 views)
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Old 10-14-2019, 03:47 AM   #9
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Default Re: Driver memory

I see... sorry to say that you cannot extend the size of your "C:" driver. It's already a single storage unit.


Best course of action is to replace it with a bigger one. It should be easy with EaseUS if you have an external storage connection to clone your current "C:" driver to a new unit and then install it in place of the current unit. It only has to be bigger (which goes without saying in this condition) to accept the old content since images (cloning) require that. No Windows re-installation is needed. Make sure the new unit is of the same physical size and connectivity as the current "C:" drive you wanna replace. Most likely it is a 3.5" HDD (but gotta make sure first) which can be replaced with a 3.5" SSD which is much faster, if you can afford the price difference.
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Old 10-14-2019, 04:05 AM   #10
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Default Re: Driver memory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smart_Guy View Post
I see... sorry to say that you cannot extend the size of your "C:" driver. It's already a single storage unit.


Best course of action is to replace it with a bigger one. It should be easy with EaseUS if you have an external storage connection to clone your current "C:" driver to a new unit and then install it in place of the current unit. It only has to be bigger (which goes without saying in this condition) to accept the old content since images (cloning) require that. No Windows re-installation is needed. Make sure the new unit is of the same physical size and connectivity as the current "C:" drive you wanna replace. Most likely it is a 3.5" HDD (but gotta make sure first) which can be replaced with a 3.5" SSD which is much faster, if you can afford the price difference.
What about my (D) drive which I already shredded for 0.5 GB? Can I use it as external drive you mentioned?
How can I check what type is my current (C) drive? I am not very familiar with all that terms but can follow instructions.
Thanks for your passion
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Old 10-14-2019, 04:38 AM   #11
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Default Re: Driver memory

The bottom line to this is that for what you are doing you have way too little space anyway.



You should be able to clone your C: to a bigger disk using something like Macrium Reflect. https://www.macrium.com/reflectfree This will allow you to clone your small C: to a larger disk that you can then use as your main C: drive. It will boot up without you having to do anything other than the clone operation and then physically swapping the two disks over. I Use Macrium a lot BUT the free version does have some limitations and very occasionally doesn't work. So if you do decide to go down that route make sure you have backed up ALL your important files.


As I have said for what you are doing, graphic design, you do not have any where near enough storage. you do need to buy much bigger disks and it may be a good idea to pay for some online storage that will guarantee not to lose your files. Unfortunately with electronics a multitude of disasters can and do happen even with stupidly expensive online storage facilities. BUT online storage do have multiple backup methods that, for you personally, to implement would be cost prohibitive I would think.



Hard drives are reasonably cheap these days even for big ones. External hard drives are easy to install and use. SSDs are much more reliable than mechanical, spinning disk, hard drives. They are more expensive but they are coming down in price and getting bigger.
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Old 10-14-2019, 05:02 AM   #12
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Default Re: Driver memory

Hi Pete I.


Most of my memory on C drive occupied by Windows itself and the programs. All my graphic works I saving at D drive which is reasonably big.
I will try to buy extra SSD rather than HDD of 1 or 2 TB and following your instructions.
Cheers
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Old 10-14-2019, 07:23 AM   #13
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Default Re: Driver memory

Quote:
Originally Posted by Radesign58 View Post
What about my (D) drive which I already shredded for 0.5 GB? Can I use it as external drive you mentioned?
How can I check what type is my current (C) drive? I am not very familiar with all that terms but can follow instructions.
Thanks for your passion
I'm afraid you can't. The existing files in the same physical drive will get in the way and you will risk losing or corrupting them thru the cloning process. You will have to extract the drive from the computer for that anyway. But if you go the path in the next paragraph, you might not need to, at least before the cloning.

Do you have any external any storage devices? If you do, there's the option to empty the whole D drive in it and use that physical drive (of D) for Windows (probably still need to physically switch it with the C drive) then use the external drive for data and keep the computer for Windows only. Cloning in this case can be done while the drive of current D is inside the laptop. Physically switching after the cloning might or might not be necessary (I lack experience in this point).

You can know the type of your storage devices from Device Manager. Just search for "Device Manager" the same way explained before for Computer Management and run it. Expand the "Disk Drives" field by clicking on the white arrow to its left. There you will see the model names. Google the names to know or post a screenshot here to see it for you. I think the C drive is already SSD because its size is a typical size for SSD's for such a laptop. But that won't help in this case anyway since the size is too low for you. There are different kinds of SSD's out there with different performance levels but the choice can only be decided by the laptop's hardware capabilities.

You don't have to be familiar with everything (no one can). Those who know can help those who don't know after all
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