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Old 02-14-2013, 09:09 AM   #1
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Default Time Tracking Software Help

Hello Guys,
I want some feed back from you, job holders must reply. What you think about an employee time tracking software system? Nowadays, it is called employee time clock and they are mostly used with biometrics. Is this something you feel annoying to punch in and out?
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Old 02-14-2013, 09:54 AM   #2
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

I removed the link to the software in case this is just a spamming attempt. If not, my apologies.

As for your question, I think every single business in the world that pays hourly wages has their employees clock in and out. There's no other way to track them. Is it annoying - maybe - but if you want paid then you do it.
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Old 02-14-2013, 10:41 AM   #3
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmacavali View Post
I removed the link to the software in case this is just a spamming attempt. If not, my apologies.

As for your question, I think every single business in the world that pays hourly wages has their employees clock in and out. There's no other way to track them. Is it annoying - maybe - but if you want paid then you do it.
I think this is very very different here in the UK.

Of course it depends on your definition of pays hourly but I work 8:30-5 and if I don't work 8-5 then my wages can be reduced but i'm never tracked.

I think it depends on the type of job and the maturity of yourself and the employer.

Quite frankly I don't like my current company, there is no reward for hard work and no mutual respect so I usually turn up to work around 8 or so and i'm usually gone by 5:01 however my last employer was great, the MD would pop in to the office every now and then (sometimes weekly sometimes monthly) and take us all out to lunch (5 man business). If you needed to go to the dentist or doctors you didn't have to take holiday it was yeah that's fine just go. So I found myself coming into work earlier (I was contracted for the same hours 8.30-5) but I was coming in at around 7:30 and sometimes not leaving until 10pm at night.

Because it was appreciated, you felt like if you put in the hours they were truly truly thankful for your work.

One of the MAJOR reasons I loved working for such a small company.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:02 AM   #4
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

Ok, so I should have said in the states....my bad.

In the states you either make an hourly wage, like $10.00 per hour. You are required to be at work from 8-5, thus essentially making $90 per day, but you still have to clock in/out. You are able to work longer and will make more per day if you do.

The other way we do it is through salary. You are still required to be at work from 8-5, but (using the above example) you get paid $25,000 per year. In this case, clocking in/out depends on the employer. However, salary people tend not to get more money if they work longer hours.

In both cases you make the same amount of money, it just depends on how you classify it. Also, what generally happens is that once the hourly rate reaches a certain amount, you are switched to salary. Factory workers/Fast food employees/General laborers/etc generally get paid hourly while Office workers/CEO's/Teacher/Doctors/etc generally get a salary.
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:13 AM   #5
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

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Originally Posted by jmacavali View Post
Ok, so I should have said in the states....my bad.

In the states you either make an hourly wage, like $10.00 per hour. You are required to be at work from 8-5, thus essentially making $90 per day, but you still have to clock in/out. You are able to work longer and will make more per day if you do.

The other way we do it is through salary. You are still required to be at work from 8-5, but (using the above example) you get paid $25,000 per year. In this case, clocking in/out depends on the employer. However, salary people tend not to get more money if they work longer hours.

In both cases you make the same amount of money, it just depends on how you classify it. Also, what generally happens is that once the hourly rate reaches a certain amount, you are switched to salary. Factory workers/Fast food employees/General laborers/etc generally get paid hourly while Office workers/CEO's/Teacher/Doctors/etc generally get a salary.


So essentially if you work overtime it's your choice?

I'd love that, if I could choose to work an extra 2 hours a day and get paid an extra 2 hours a day I'd do it all the time!

Does it not need authorisation?

Or is if you work 8-5, if you work under ie 8-4 you get paid less if you work over well you still only get paid 8-5?
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:27 AM   #6
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

No, most places require you to work 8-5 (or whatever hours they set) regardless of how you get paid. Salary employees are allowed to work overtime because they don't get paid any more. Hourly employees are only allowed to work overtime if it is approved by the boss/company first. Sometimes though factories have "mandatory overtime" meaning you have to work longer (and get paid accordingly) and sometimes they offer "voluntary overtime" to anyone who wants it. 40 hours per week is considered "full-time" and anything over that and it's considered overtime. Also most places give you "time and a half" for overtime, meaning you make 1.5x more per hour for any hours you work over 40 per week. So using the above example still, if you worked 50 hours in 1 week and you make $10 per hour, you'd get paid $400 for the first 40 hours, then $150 for the 10 overtimes hours ($10 per hour x 1.5=$15 per hour for overtime x 10 overtime hours = $150). So you'd actually make $550 for that week. Factory work tends to bounce between 40-50 hours depending on how busy the company is.

You are not allowed to work less than the required number of hours though.

A lot of hourly work is considered "part time" too. That means you work less than 40 hours per week (even if it's 39 hours per week). Employers are not required to offer health care/insurance/retirement/etc to part time employees. These are generally your fast food employees/retail employees (like the people who work at the stores in the mall)/etc.

Also, these are just general rules most places use. Not every company is the same and they are all allowed to do it however they want.
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:00 PM   #7
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

30 and up is considered full time according to the labor board. It may varies from state to state. But if you go by that then 30 hour workers are entitled to full time benes. Food service and hospitality industry is a totally didn't set of stripes on the zebra. Hotels are the exception. They come under office and factory rules. Full time is 30 and up. You must pay overtime after 40 hours. You can not work more than 16 consecutive hours with out a 8 hour break. And the list goes on and on and on. Mississippi has got to be the most restrictive state I've ever run a hotel in. It's almost like they don't want people to get jobs. Strange indeed...
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Old 02-14-2013, 02:09 PM   #8
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

So I know this isn't the best website, but if anything it just shows how much grey area there is: What Is Considered Full Time Employment in Ohio? | eHow.com
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Old 02-19-2013, 09:38 AM   #9
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

In my opinion employee time tracking software’s are essential especially in business, where it assures employees are working during working hours and not wasting their time on unrelated to work activities. There are also lots of approaches to time tracking and biometrics is one of it. In our company, we often spend most of the time in front of the computer. Instead of using biometrics we use a tool called Time Doctor, which tracks all out activities in real time. Can you imagine how vulnerable we are on distractions in the internet? One good thing about this tool, it does not invade employees’ privacy.
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Old 02-19-2013, 11:51 AM   #10
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Default Re: Time Tracking Software Help

What's said above is true. but often times overtime is paid extra in a salaried job.

So for example, my job is advertised as a salaried job.

I am paid as a salaried wage.

that is to say, that I get the same amount this month (20 working days of february) as I did last month, 23 working days.
despite having worked some 24 hours longer. and I'll get paid the same next month when there are 21 working days.

obviously if I were paid hourly I'd be getting 23 x 8 lots of hours in January, (big pay check) and 20 x8 hours in February, (smaller pay check).

when you are salaried your wage does not alter with your hours worked in accordance with your job description.



which is where it gets confusing.

I used to work in a burger king when I was a student. on bank holidays, people like me (hourly rate staff) were paid double time. and given time off in lieu, (which was actually just paid so we got tripple time). when I worked bank holidays my hourly rate was higher than the rate applied to managers, (e.g we earned more for working that Monday than the manager did, because the manager was salaried.)

Now the hourly rate was set as a perk to make sure that staff were willing to work on the bank holiday, such that there would be adequate levels of staff to meet demand.
the managers were paid less, but only for that day, ordinarily they were paid more, it just sucked for them on that day.
in that case even though it's a holiday, the business is still open, it's a Monday, and the manager that works Mondays still has to work Mondays, because that's what his contract says.

However, if you are a person who works 9 - 5, (or 9:30 - 6 as I do). and you are asked to come in early, asked to stay late, or asked to do work out of hours etc, then that is outside of your normal duties as defined in your contract, and you are paid overtime.


Basically, you agree a contract, and agree a salaried rate for that contract, being asked to do anything outside of that contract is open to negotiation of pay, or additional benefits, (for example I've worked overtime into an evening not for overtime, but on the understanding that I've earned time off in Lieu and therefore accrued extra holiday days.

Most contracts include clauses regarding reason ability, staying 15 minutes late occasionally to finish your work is reasonable, you would not expect additional money in your salary to account for this.
however, if you stay 15 minutes every day over a 20 days working month that's an extra 5 hours, (nearly an extra day) after a while this may fail to be a reasonable request (that you stay late every day without additional numeration) and so you would be justified in either asking that you be paid for your services as overtime (since it happens every day), or that you need additional staff members to complete work set.
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