Go Back   Computer Forums > Welcome To Computer Forums .org > Social Lounge | Off Topic
Click Here to Login
Join Computer forums Today


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-17-2017, 03:12 PM   #1
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,827
Default Some common spelling mistakes in English...

Hello guys.

Without any ado at all (except for the hello above)... let's get started.

Its and it's:
There is a big difference here. "Its" is the possessive form of the pronoun "it". Example for it is "this car looks ugly. Its grill is so big and deformed". The two relate exactly the same as with "he" and "his", and "she" and "her".
"It's" on the other hand is an abbreviation of either "it is" or "it has". And example for them is "it's interesting how it's been only two hours since we got here". The first "it's" stands for "it is" and the second stands for "it has".

Should of?!?!?
Okay, there is no such a thing as "should of". That's a wrong English... ah... thing. It is a mistake people make (hey, that rhymes!) when they try to type "should have". So yeah, the right spelling is "should have" or, as an abbreviation, "should've" <<< (the reason some people think it is "should of" because it sounds like it).

Your and you're:

I believe this is so obvious. "Your" is basically the possessive form of "you", and "you're" is an abbreviation of "you are". Because of the way they sound, just like the earlier problems, this misspelling is seen from time to time.

There and they're (and rarely "their"):
Same as above, these two are sometimes confused with each other because of how they sound. "There" is the distant form the "here" (there are other uses for it too), "they're" is an abbreviation of "they are, and "their" is the possessive form of "they".

Me and I ?
Okay, this is not a spelling mistake really, it is more of a verbal miss use. Sometimes, usually when more than one subject/object is used, "me" could be mistakenly used instead of "I". When the referred noun is used as a subject part of speech, "I" is used, but when it is used as an object part of speech, "me" is used. Examples for that are " Carlita and I went to the grocery store" and "RF gave gifts to Psychoslice and me".

Abdul?!?!
There is no such a word or name as "Abdul". It's a made up name by the misinformed non Arabs that became ridiculously common. Originally it is "abd" and a transformed "al", where the former means slave or creation and the latter is just the definitive article "the" in Arabic cut from the word that should follow it. When it is used, the right and correct way to use it is to connect it to another word without spaces. An example is "Abdulelah", or it can be spelled "AbdulElah" as the connected word is originally Elah, as Muslims use it to refer to God. Arabs before Islam used it too with other gods. That name is actually "Abd" + "al" + "Elah". The only way that "Abdul" is correct word, as opposed to my explanation, is that if it is originated from something else other than that. Actually, there are three ways to put such names depending on their position in the context, but that's complicated and I believe it is okay to just used the above mentioned form in languages other than Arabic.

I've and I have:
The first one; "I've" is obviously an abbreviation of "I have". What could be hidden here tho is that "have" here is an auxiliary verb, not a lexical verb. In layman language, auxiliary verbs are verbs used to support other verbs like in cases of perfect tense sentences; e.g I have seen. Here it can be abbreviated to "I've seen". A lexical verb "have" is as in the example "I have some shawurma here". It is formally wrong to say "I've some shawurma here". Some Americans use it, and there is no problem with that at all. All I'm doing here is telling how the original correct way to do it in good standard English. It probably was "I've got (any object)" that with time transformed to "I've (an object)".

Am I missing anything else?

Important note:
I don't mean it is bad to make those mistakes in normal daily life conversations nor am I trying to be a jerk. All there is to it is that I'm clarifying the real correct use of it. I honestly think some people don't know "should of" is actually wrong.
__________________

__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2017, 08:22 PM   #2
Golden Master
 
Celery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5,404
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

Well hell, I should of known that.
__________________

__________________
I came on a Celeron and now my PC has Ryzen!
Celery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2017, 11:59 PM   #3
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,827
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

Yeah, its common sense
__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2017, 07:31 AM   #4
Fully Optimized
 
strollin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 2,334
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

You left out:

The two of us want to go to the store too.
__________________
strollin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2017, 07:42 AM   #5
Golden Master
 
Celery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5,404
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

She sells seashells by the seashore.
__________________
I came on a Celeron and now my PC has Ryzen!
Celery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2017, 07:49 AM   #6
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,827
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

Quote:
Originally Posted by strollin View Post
You left out:

The two of us want to go to the store too.
Come to think of it... I do see people mistake too and to, although extremely rarely.
__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2017, 06:23 PM   #7
BSOD
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: US
Posts: 963
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

The one that drives me crazy (figuratively) is when people interchange then and than.
Then is temporal, "now and then" while than is comparative, "I am taller than you."

---------- Post added at 05:18 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:13 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smart_Guy View Post
Come to think of it... I do see people mistake too and to, although extremely rarely.
Can you think of a way that is grammatically correct to say "There are three tüs in the English Language" without using the phonetic?

---------- Post added at 05:21 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:18 PM ----------

I see you used the word 'tho', which of course is not a word at all, you meant to write 'though'.

---------- Post added at 05:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:21 PM ----------

I see people abbreviate 'until' as till, when it should be 'til' since a 'till' is a cash register drawer.
__________________
Technician is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2017, 06:31 PM   #8
BSOD
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: US
Posts: 963
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

What about who and whom? Use who when it can be replaced by he and whom when it can be replaced by him.
__________________
Technician is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2017, 06:37 PM   #9
Golden Master
 
Celery's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5,404
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

The English is being butchered because we're using shortcuts to save on typing. I'm guilty for some and it's already a habit.
__________________
I came on a Celeron and now my PC has Ryzen!
Celery is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2017, 10:53 AM   #10
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,827
Default Re: Some common spelling mistakes in English...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
The one that drives me crazy (figuratively) is when people interchange then and than.
Then is temporal, "now and then" while than is comparative, "I am taller than you."
Oh yeah, the then and than problem is there too. Verbal language is originally spoken, and writing is just a tool to put the language down on records so I'd understand why should of and should've would be confused for sounding similar, but confusing then and than feels beyond simply sounding similar.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
Can you think of a way that is grammatically correct to say "There are three tüs in the English Language" without using the phonetic?
Further to what I said above that verbal language is originally spoken, I'm used to that expression of numbering in some rare cases and honestly cannot think of a way to use it unless there is an unorthodox way to refer to them that gets used and with time becomes known. An example I know of is the Three F's the those three stand for "effin, financing and feeding" (where effin is the bad F word). Google search has come to know this Three F's and the first search page will give it directly. So I guess maybe at some point we can call them the Three T's in English? Note sure, but I think how "to" has its special rule to sound with long or short /u/ could ruin this rule.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post

I see you used the word 'tho', which of course is not a word at all, you meant to write 'though'.
Yes, that's rights. I'm intentionally doing it as a short form for informal writing just to save time. Trying to save time is indeed a problem. Let alone the hassle of writing "though"... ugh? Dunno why English has it like this really if there is no other word as "tho" which sounds exactly the same... or does it not?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post

I see people abbreviate 'until' as till, when it should be 'til' since a 'till' is a cash register drawer.
Now that one is very good to add to the list.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
What about who and whom? Use who when it can be replaced by he and whom when it can be replaced by him.
Ditto.

Being an English graduate, I explain this one in a professional way. Who is used if it is in a subject and whom if it is an object. This trick of he and him is a good one for layman use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Celery View Post
The English is being butchered because we're using shortcuts to save on typing. I'm guilty for some and it's already a habit.
True, this is the most important cause behind it. But the difference is whether we know if it is a mistake or not, or whether we know that if we do it we could cause a confusion.

This thread is not really to bash you and others for that approach. I just felt that it is a good idea to make it so those who got used to it without knowing the correct usage in the first place could go on thinking they are correct.

Like I said, I have a strong feeling some people really thing "should of" is correct and never knew the correction is actually "should've (or have)". I remember seeing a sign that says "if you're in America, speak are language". I can't think of a reason why one would mistake our with are.
__________________

__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0