Go Back   Computer Forums > Welcome To Computer Forums .org > Social Lounge | Off Topic
Click Here to Login
Join Computer forums Today


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-04-2013, 02:50 PM   #11
Fully Optimized
 
jmacavali's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,867
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strollin View Post
I haven't studied a lot of languages and don't consider myself an "expert" on my native English language but I know that other languages have their idiosyncrasies as well. For instance, German has the concept of gender specific nouns that are masculine, feminine or neuter (der, die, or das) which gave me no end of problems when I took high school German.
I believe that most "romance" languages do that as well.
__________________

__________________
****************************************
Don't take life too seriously -- no one gets out alive. Plus, who wants to arrive to the hereafter in pristine condition wearing a suit and tie?
I want to slide in sideways, worn out, used up, hair a mess, clothes tattered, & screaming, "Whooo! What a ride!"
****************************************
jmacavali is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 04:21 AM   #12
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,232
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

One of the difficulties I have in my English is vocabulary. Yup, I tend to use, prefer actually, general words to describe things instead of using more specific words. So I almost never use "molar" or "canine", but instead "tooth" is enough, or a better example would be "small finger" instead of pinky, or maybe "bad" instead of so many words that describe something, well, not good. I happened to know the above mentioned words, but there are so many other cases that don't come to mind now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ssc456 View Post

It's not that I don't know when to use There, Their or They're it's just that sometimes I'm typing very fast and thinking more about the context of my sentences than the grammatical correctness.

I'm interested in how difficult non native English speakers find things like They're Their and There.
I for one don't have problems with grammar, but I do with spelling.

When it comes to the given examples above, I have no problems at all maybe because I learned those words separately to us in the first place. In my early stages, I never used abbreviation then. Learning those abbreviations came in an advanced level and it did not start academically, but through live events like cartoons and games. I used to ask my parent about it. They were not professionals, but at least knew these.

Maybe my case is different because my interest and education in English were special (or especial?!?!).

I noticed that many native English users, specifically Americans, write (or type on the internet at least) "of" instead of "have" with "could" or "should" in a context like "could of done it" instead of "could have done it". I know the reason behind this, which is in speaking it is "could've" and "of" is pronounced "ov", so it creates this conflict in writing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ja6on View Post
just a tip... you would use especially not specially
Thank you.

I remember looking this up before, and all I got was "especially" is rhetorically used before nouns. It was really confusing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
Here's the sad part of this whole thread...

I see better English and sentence structure here than I do in my Online College course discussion boards.

Our education system sucks and is only getting worse.

Then again, who needs education when you have freedom?!?!? MURICA!
Maybe because of interest? Studying is never as fun as, well, anything else.

With loss of interest, things usually become complicated.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmacavali View Post
As far as the topic is concerned, I really think English is a stupid language and there are way to many rules - and exceptions to those rules. Also, in general, I think grammar is stupid. If I get my point across then what does it matter if I say 'my friend and I' or 'me and my friend'. It's the same thing, who decided that it should be one way or the other. And all the parts of speech? What a waste of time. I'm able to talk, read, and write coherently and professionally. When was the last time I considered the verb or noun of my sentence, let alone a preposisiton or adverb.
Well, different situations call for different approaches I believe. If this makes any sense at all ha ha.

I personally screw my English up when I use it with easy going, cool people. An American friend of mine on face book go under this description. Whenever I send him a message, I start with something like "hey man" or "sup bro" or "how's is hanging" and between lines "wanna" or "gonna" or similar. Not to mention "K" instead of "okay". "Me" and "I" don't matter here, but at work I move to the professional side and become very formal, that I use each in their exact position. "Someone, that guy, someone else, and I are going to attend that meeting" is what I use at work, while "someone, he, him, me, and whoever" (notice the sequence of "me" as well) I use in fishing trips for example.

I get it that you don't get involved in many formal English events maybe?

Quote:
Originally Posted by strollin View Post
I haven't studied a lot of languages and don't consider myself an "expert" on my native English language but I know that other languages have their idiosyncrasies as well. For instance, German has the concept of gender specific nouns that are masculine, feminine or neuter (der, die, or das) which gave me no end of problems when I took high school German.
Same thing in Arabic. We even have a more complicated system called inflection signs. Really complicated. This word for example كتب could be read in four different words at least.

Maybe you don't consider yourself an expert, but that would be on the formal level. On the communicative and comprehensive level tho, you are an expert. Trust me

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmacavali View Post
I believe that most "romance" languages do that as well.
Oh, believe me Sir, Arabic is faaar from anything related to romance (with small "r")
__________________

__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 09:43 AM   #13
BSOD
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: MI, USA
Posts: 722
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iPwn View Post
Here's the sad part of this whole thread...

I see better English and sentence structure here than I do in my Online College course discussion boards.

Our education system sucks and is only getting worse.

Then again, who needs education when you have freedom?!?!? MURICA!
In my area a large amount of kids skipped school today.. to play Call of Duty: Ghosts. What has this nation come to.. And I don't personally like English. Smart_Guy is probably the best English speller here :P
Life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 10:10 AM   #14
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,232
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Yeah, I cast spells in English ha ha.

k, I'll tell ya'll a lil secret (say what!?!?!). Firefox here has an on-the-fly auto spell check

But I do get some complicated words correctly from the first try. Really, I do

There is one more problem I face in English speaking; the "R" sound. I can't seem to get it right if it is in final position. No problems with the Initial and medial. Since I'm more of an American English speakers, this really bothers me.
__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 10:39 AM   #15
Fully Optimized
 
strollin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 1,943
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smart_Guy View Post
...

There is one more problem I face in English speaking; the "R" sound. I can't seem to get it right if it is in final position. No problems with the Initial and medial. Since I'm more of an American English speakers, this really bothers me.
Asians seem to have a problem with R's as well. My wife is Korean and tends to pronounce R as an L. She has been in the US for 40 years so it's not as pronounced as it was many years ago.

I'm sure many of us would have problems with pronunciation of Arabic words and sounds.

You bring up another good point regarding American English versus UK English. Even though we technically speak the same language, there are times when I can't even understand what a UK English speaker is saying. This is especially true for me when watching films made in the UK.
strollin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2013, 10:54 AM   #16
Fully Optimized
 
jmacavali's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,867
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

If it makes you feel any better, my 3 year old can't say his L sounds yet!

ok, bad joke.
__________________
****************************************
Don't take life too seriously -- no one gets out alive. Plus, who wants to arrive to the hereafter in pristine condition wearing a suit and tie?
I want to slide in sideways, worn out, used up, hair a mess, clothes tattered, & screaming, "Whooo! What a ride!"
****************************************
jmacavali is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 06:39 AM   #17
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,232
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strollin View Post
Asians seem to have a problem with R's as well. My wife is Korean and tends to pronounce R as an L. She has been in the US for 40 years so it's not as pronounced as it was many years ago.

I'm sure many of us would have problems with pronunciation of Arabic words and sounds.

You bring up another good point regarding American English versus UK English. Even though we technically speak the same language, there are times when I can't even understand what a UK English speaker is saying. This is especially true for me when watching films made in the UK.
The thing is; I feel bad about it because I'm an English graduate. It's my major. I actually studies how voices can be done so with the description of any voice I should be able to do it. That's why only final positioned "R" sometimes sound not right for me. At times I do it perfectly. Of course, just in case, I mean /r/ that lets the air go without the tongue touching the upper part (ceiling) of the mouth cavity.

Yeah, some UK dialects really blow my mind up as well. As for the media, I believe they use some dialect called Royal English if my memory serves me right. I don't have problem with, but still, American English is my thing. In USA there are some difficult dialects as well, but not really as complicated as it is in the UK. Dunno much about the Australian Accent and it's different dialects, but I did see a Youtube clip that left me completely puzzled.
__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2013, 07:13 AM   #18
Fully Optimized
 
ssc456's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 4,279
Send a message via MSN to ssc456
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Yeah I do think it is funny how the UK even England is so small yet we have so many different accents within a small place and regional dialects.

ie your head, mostly slang but in football over the years I've heard it be referred to as so many things.

So your running into the box and you shout to your friend "On the head" as if to say cross it to me at head level.

On me head
On me nut
On me swede
On me nugget
On me carrot
On me barnet
On me loaf

Most of them don't make any sense but they were used quite a lot.

The incorporation of Cockney Rhyming Slang must also be a right confusion for non native English speakers.

A couple that I use quite a lot.
"Chuck us the dog love" - Pass me the phone please love.
"How'd u afford that, five finger discount was it?" - How did you afford that, did you steal it?
"I'm going down the pub on me todd" - Going to the pub by myself.
"Have a butchers at this love". Have a look at this please love.
__________________
He who has never failed has never attempted anything worth succeeding at.

Dont Eat Animals, Its Not Good For Them And They Dont Like It!
ssc456 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2013, 03:11 AM   #19
Fully Optimized
 
Smart_Guy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Saudi Arabia
Posts: 3,232
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Yup, I remember uncle Sid speaking this Cockney dialect. But seriously, and no offense, it sounds like a different language or a made up language based on English words.
__________________
My main rig (click here).
Smart_Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2013, 03:59 AM   #20
Fully Optimized
 
ssc456's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 4,279
Send a message via MSN to ssc456
Default Re: The Non-Native English Speakers Thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smart_Guy View Post
Yup, I remember uncle Sid speaking this Cockney dialect. But seriously, and no offense, it sounds like a different language or a made up language based on English words.
It is. . . . .

I believe and this is what I remember from a long time ago but it was a language made up by slaves in London a long time ago so they could have conversations without people knowing what they are talking about.

P.S when I say a long time ago I don't back "back in the day" lol I mean a couple of years ago when I looked it up.
Also phrases like "Back in the day"!
__________________

__________________
He who has never failed has never attempted anything worth succeeding at.

Dont Eat Animals, Its Not Good For Them And They Dont Like It!
ssc456 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
arabic, english, learn, native

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0