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Old 09-12-2005, 09:59 PM   #1
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Default dust off danger

hey my mom just reveiceived this email saying that somebody inhaled u dust off the compresed air thing u use on ur computer when its dusty well somebody said there kid died because he inhaled it and soon just suffacated. i found it kinda fake beacuse this was an adult and had wierd spelling. and it actually conaints a chemical called r2 and what happens is it makes all the good are stay out and all the bad stay in. or something like that. the letter kinda spooked me because the kid died two seconds after he inhaled the stuff and he died with his eyse open and everything he didnt even know it. and whats kreepy about it is that they do it in schools.
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Old 09-12-2005, 10:11 PM   #2
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In every day normal use the compressed air is perfectly safe. But when you stick that tube in your mouth and inhale large amouts of the gas it can be deadly. It not only blocks out the oxygen molecule, it's ultra low temps freezes your lung tissue.
Anything can be abused.
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Old 09-12-2005, 10:17 PM   #3
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yea he suffered from frost bite on his tounge.
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Old 09-12-2005, 10:22 PM   #4
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The reason he died was because oxygen could reach his lungs. The coolant that is used to keep the air compressed is called R2, and it is a very HEAVY gas. When you inhale it, it gives you a 10 second light feeling (a buzz), but many times, the coolant doesnt leave the lungs, and you die very quickly because you drown in R2 coolant (your lungs can't get any oxygen into them because the R2 coolant is heavier then air). Very painful, I inhaled R2 in a class last year when were designing a diode transistor series. It burned my lungs.
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:13 PM   #5
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Just a couple corrections - no offense Opteronix: it's not coolant. It's a heavy gas used to propel whatever material out of the can. Frostbite occurs usually when the can is held upside-down allowing the actual propellant gas to escape. The rapid decompression of the strongly compressed propellant causes it to become supercooled.

You can try this by spraying something (NOT YOU OR ANYONE ELSE!!!) with an upside-down can of compressed air. It will freeze things on contact.

But yes, the gas basically prevents air from getting into your lungs. The high is just lack of oxygen to the brain - nothing more.
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:18 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spank_fusion
Just a couple corrections - no offense Opteronix: it's not coolant. It's a heavy gas used to propel whatever material out of the can. Frostbite occurs usually when the can is held upside-down allowing the actual propellant gas to escape. The rapid decompression of the strongly compressed propellant causes it to become supercooled.

You can try this by spraying something (NOT YOU OR ANYONE ELSE!!!) with an upside-down can of compressed air. It will freeze things on contact.

But yes, the gas basically prevents air from getting into your lungs. The high is just lack of oxygen to the brain - nothing more.
Think again, I know what I am talking about being that I have used it. R2 is a derivation of Freon, which is a COOLANT, and gases at lower temps CONDENSE, thus, being able to fit MORE gas in a given container via molecular compression and london dispersion forces holding the molecules in close proximity to each other.

The propellant aspect behind it is simple. Gas needs to escape when under enormous pressure.. therefore, if you open the valve, it seeks to equilize the pressure equalibrium. So please..... no more ok?
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:26 PM   #7
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Dude, it's not a coolant. Also, you just completely agreed with what I said about compression. The gas inside is compressed, and when pressure decreases, so does temperature. So what's the argument there? Perhaps I should simplify it:

When the gas comes out (decompression), temperature decreases (cooling).

Do we agree now?

Also, as a side note, not every can of compressed material uses the same propellant. There are different kinds.
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:26 PM   #8
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Default Re: dust off danger

Some morons in my computer repair class use to "huff" that stuff...morons...>
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:31 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spank_fusion
Dude, it's not a coolant. Also, you just completely agreed with what I said about compression. The gas inside is compressed, and when pressure decreases, so does temperature. So what's the argument there? Perhaps I should simplify it:

When the gas comes out (decompression), temperature decreases (cooling).

Do we agree now?

Also, as a side note, not every can of compressed material uses the same propellant. There are different kinds.
UGh................. R2= a COOLANT, which COOLS the GAS, thus CAUSING it to COMPRESS and COLLAPSE via London Dispersion forces and gas laws. The molecular structure of R2 is that of a HYPERCOOLANT, so why do wish to continue argueing with someone in Chemistry 481!!!

Oh, and when Pressure DECREASES... temperature INCREASES as the molecules are not jammed together via LD forces and they do not release nearly the same amount of entropy.... when pressure increases, temperatures decrease drastically (see the process of making Liquid Nitrogen/Oxygen/Xenon, etc)
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Old 09-12-2005, 11:42 PM   #10
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Alright dude, time to go back to high school:

http://science.howstuffworks.com/aerosol-can.htm
http://www.yorks.karoo.net/aerosol/link4.htm

And you might want to consider taking chemistry 101 (You only have to read the first few lines of the first reference link - the rest are mostly for verification.):

http://dbhs.wvusd.k12.ca.us/webdocs/...ay-Lussac.html
http://www.math.montana.edu/frankw/c...boyle/body.htm
http://www.chm.davidson.edu/Chemistr...aws/index.html
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