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Old 02-21-2007, 08:49 PM   #41
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Default Re: british vs american words

it wasnt bush.. it was a vice prez.. cant remember who though.

most americans say tom-ay-toe [i think]

and isnt some easter candy different in the two countries? i remember LK telling me about it. lol now thats how you know youve been here a while... you remember LK
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Old 02-22-2007, 04:52 AM   #42
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Default Re: british vs american words

chocolate in general tastes different in America to what it does in Britain.

in britain we get easter eggs, chocolate rabbits etc, not too disimillar to the easter chocolates that I saw being sold whilst I was in America last week.

you even get Cadburys cream eggs.
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:22 AM   #43
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Default Re: british vs american words

Quote:
Originally Posted by root
chocolate in general tastes different in America to what it does in Britain.
Which is best? Whats different?
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:37 AM   #44
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Default Re: british vs american words

I think british is better, it's sweeter/creamier, I generally find that american chocolate has a more chemical kind of taste to it, but I guess it's down to individual preference.
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:41 AM   #45
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Default Re: british vs american words

Yeah I found that, american chocolate tastes kind of fake, and plasticky, nothing like a good bar of british chocolate, my ex over there, used to ask me to send over bars of british chocolate over there.

The other thing I found was, cheese............completely different to over here to there...
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:45 AM   #46
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Default Re: british vs american words

Quote:
Originally Posted by luckyduck
it wasnt bush.. it was a vice prez.. cant remember who though.

most americans say tom-ay-toe [i think], and isnt some easter candy different in the two countries? i remember LK telling me about it. lol now thats how you know youve been here a while... you remember LK
Root tells us that you have easter eggs, I didn't know that, I thought it all centred round the easter bunny over there, but I'm pretty sure you don't have hot cross buns, a short history; Originally used in English pagan ceremonies, the christian church tried to ban them, in Elizabeth the 1st's reign the were limited to religious ceremonies, not like today they are sold all the year round now, last week I bought a pack of six, & wow, the spicy smell as they're toasting!!, I have them smothered in thick butter, I know, I know, but I don't care any more, I often eat them will a chunk of English Cheddar cheese, & strawberry jam, yum yum!
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Old 02-22-2007, 05:51 AM   #47
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Default Re: british vs american words

Did you try any bud over there? I got told off someone a while back (an american) that ours tastes much better.
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Old 02-22-2007, 08:37 AM   #48
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Default Re: british vs american words

no, the only beerthat I drank was guiness... (and I did drink a hell of a lot of it in the middle of the week) (washed down with some Jamesons after that)... that was a long night...
one that saw me going back to the bar the next to retireve clothes that I had forgotten to put on before trying to walk beck to my hotel a bit brams and list in the snow...
twas fun though.

I didn't really see the large chocolate eggs, but there were pack of mini eggs and creme eggs, I imagine that this are made in britain though since they are both cadbury.
and just sent to america.
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Old 02-22-2007, 09:09 AM   #49
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Default Re: british vs american words

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raffaz
Did you try any bud over there? I got told off someone a while back (an american) that ours tastes much better.
Over here or over there bud always tastes bad
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Old 02-22-2007, 09:31 AM   #50
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Default Re: british vs american words

:-/ at first i most definitely didnt think bud was referring to beer

where im from [and it might be a regional thing] bud means pot [marijuana]
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