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Old 12-14-2005, 09:19 AM   #1
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Default machine and assembly language

what is the difference between machine and assembly language? also, which language uses 0101010101? can you do just about anything with the 1 and 0 code? Finally, does anyone know the 10101 language, and if you do know it, where can i learn it?
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Old 12-14-2005, 09:53 AM   #2
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Default Re: machine and assembly language

10010101 is binary

search google on how to change decimal into binary and then into hex etc

as for machine language that is 1010101 (someone correct me if im wrong) and assemble language is the same thing

why would you want to learn binary though? at college we have to do binary arithmatic
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Old 12-14-2005, 11:58 AM   #3
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Default Re: machine and assembly language

Well, there is a bit more to it than what has been said here. Any instruction or data on a digital computing device is expressed in binary. The command structure of a processor uses instructions coded in binary at the hardware level along with certain flag registers and the processor's clock to execute these instructions. It is not extremely difficult to code in machine language, just extremely tedious, boring and inefficient. But the very first computers were programmed this way by hand, often using, yes, Virginia, toggle switches and a "Set Line Button".
The next generation of computer language harnessed the power of the computer to get us out of the by hand mess, which had created a lot of bugs, glitches and random features. It was a miracle called an assembler. It took short, two or three letter pneumonic codes that represented the machine language instructions and re-wrote the actual machine language file that was represented. What a boon! Now the computer spoke at least pidgeon English.
So, now we have third generation languages like C, C++ and Pascal. And fourth like ... oh, well now you get it. Assembly languages are as low as you need to go effectively just allowing the assembler to control the actual constructs of machine language. And that is what all the rest arrange to do for you too, after some level of manipulations and groomings, is create that machine language file or que it up in RAM to run. Hope this puts the explanation in more meaningful terms!
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Old 12-15-2005, 08:36 AM   #4
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Default Re: machine and assembly language

can you access things like the clock speed of a cpu or the speed that a hard drive spins and make them faster,slower,ect?
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Old 12-15-2005, 03:46 PM   #5
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Default Re: machine and assembly language

The answer to that question is NOT! You can manipulate the firmware that controls the hardware device's private routines, but even firmware can't give a harddrive a faster spinning motor or change the base freqeuncies that are valid for a processor. Many pieces of hardware may use a firmware emulation or software emulation for certain tasks and these may be manipulated, but beyond that, no, the hardware stays the same physical device.
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Old 12-16-2005, 07:47 AM   #6
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Default Re: machine and assembly language

so you couldnt make a program to oc your cpu? since you can change the bios settings at startup, couldnt you change them with a program and when your computer is booted up?
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Old 12-16-2005, 02:55 PM   #7
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Default Re: machine and assembly language

Not what I intended to convey, sorry. Yes, if you have a processor that's clock speed is controlled through firmware at boot, you could write a program that will change the firmware's "clock speed" at boot or even after boot. However, that doesn't mean that
a) the speeds [overclocked, right or underclocked] that the processor is stable at will be changed anymore than they are when you set the clock speed with the BIOS's original firmware.
b) the firmware or another program change anything physically in the hardware, they just plant bits and bytes in locations that control the hardware's internal configuration.
c) in this case, the clock speed is regulated by the motherboard and processor in concert and the maximums and minimums will be set there. Anything outside this range may well create unexpected and detrimental results as the main clock often controls the "heartbeat" of the bus and RAM clocks as well.
I hope that this shows you more of what I mean when I say programs can't change hardware physically. It basically boils down to this: hardware can be affected if it is designed to take parameters from a firmware or software program normally, but not if it can't be controlled in that same manner and valid range by original design.
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