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Old 05-04-2009, 06:22 AM   #11
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

No in my example I was not subneting but I found fault in your example also. Keep in mind this is not meant as an insult or to start a cyber war. Iím out of practice myself and this made me think (allot) and consult the books (this is a good thing for I want to get back into it). You did not really subnet off a network address either.
If we took 192.168.0.1 and gave it a mask of 255.255.255.192 we are taking that last octet using two of the bits for the subnetting portion and the other six for hostís which in this case will give us.

So plugging these numbers into my last example:

R1 interface (1) (internet ***.***.***.*** whatever)
R1 interface (2) (Your office) 192.168.0.1/26 network ID 192.168.0.0
R2 interface (1) 192.168.0.2/26
R2 interface (2) 192.168.0.65/26 network ID 192.168.0.64
R3 interface (1) 192.168.0.3/26
R3 interface (2) 192.168.2.129/26 network ID 192.168.0.128
Carving up that same address 192.168.0.0 and giving a mask of 255.255.255.240 taking 4 bits from the host side would give 16 subnets,

In your example you are changing up the subnet mask for every router. Even with the 10.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 its going to yield 65536 subnets and 253 host per subnet.
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Old 05-04-2009, 09:51 PM   #12
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

hhmm... I see where I am wrong... I did not at all take it as though you are trying to insult me or anything... You made me think for a bit there too... It has been a long time since I looked at the CCNA books (which btw would be outdated now anyways lol(not to mention they weren't mine I borrowed my colleague's books while in our other classes lol) ), plus I never really read each chapter, I sped read lol....
Though no offense you are still off a bit, as I'm sure I am too..
255.255.255.0 would not yield 65536 subnets; though 255.255.0.0 would yield that many...
Though my example I was a bit off... Instead of giving the subnets as to actually separating the distinct number of subnets, I was simple using the classes (A,B,C).. Rather then using a legit subnet.. I should have done something more like;255.255.255.251, 255.255.255.4, 255.255.254.0, 255.255.253.0; respectively of course(starting from originating router)... Though I wouldn't be surprised if I am wrong... I am pretty tired at the moment lol..
Also taking 4 bits off would not yield a subnet of 255.255.255.240, but rather 255.255.255.251 (or so I believe it should).... Later when I am not so tired, I will do some more research.. If you think I am wrong (as I would not be surprised if I am), shoot your theories lol..
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Old 05-13-2009, 04:52 PM   #13
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

I think I bit off more than I can chew... lol. I just realized that there is more to subnetting than I though.

if you have IP 192.168.0.1 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0, is IP 192.168.1.1 considered as another subnet?

I'm thinking no because 192.168.0.x is the network ID and that is not the same as subnet. Am I right?
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Old 05-13-2009, 09:03 PM   #14
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

Quote:
Originally Posted by david90 View Post
I think I bit off more than I can chew... lol. I just realized that there is more to subnetting than I though.
if you have IP 192.168.0.1 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0, is IP 192.168.1.1 considered as another subnet?
I'm thinking no because 192.168.0.x is the network ID and that is not the same as subnet. Am I right?
Hi David
No it does not work like that (but you are kind off there). What you may want to do is pick up ďTCP/IP for DummiesĒ and it will cover allot more than subnetting. Love the dummy books, itís how I learned DOS after that book I was writing BAT files left and right! And itís a better read than the official Cisco!
Check this out also http://www.ralphb.net/IPSubnet/

To check yourself you can download a free subnet calculator also. Same one I used above. http://www.solarwinds.com/downloads/
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Old 05-19-2009, 01:17 AM   #15
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

mmm

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Originally Posted by axegrinder View Post
Hey David
I’m having more questions than answers and just to give you a little food for thought (maybe or maybe not)
Subnet the network: most cases would be better control over network traffic if there is too much going on (traffic). You might want to subnet also just for topography (but not necessary) reasons 1st floor 2nd floor and 5th floor and as already said by CrossCech might want to keep departments isolated from each other accounting, warehouse, terminal services and so on. There is also a company has their own web server and wants to keep it on a separate network from the rest of the companies servers and workstations. But you also brought up about the two networks seeing each other’s shares. So I have to ask why are you thinking of sub netting? As far as the MS shares you won’t be able to see them on a different subnet, but it can be done.
Things I have to ask. How many routers, switches and clients? How would you implement this, what I mean. Is the network DHCP? How are you going to implement who is on what network? Or would the one network be static addressing (which would be fine). So kind of need to know your hardware situation a little better. A fair amount of ways to go about it.

A few situations, nothing is in stone and other people can have better ideas.
Going to assume there is a router in place for internet (call it R1) and also going to ASSUME it has two interfaces (internet and your place of business) you want 2 networks basically. You could get two more routers (both going to R1) one to address each network (or subnetwork) this can be two fold because it can also take care of addressing for each network since most routers have DHCP.
So I like CrossCech’s method let’s just change the third octet in 192.168.***.***/24 scheme
R1 interface (1) (internet ***.***.***.*** whatever)
R1 interface (2) (Your office) 192.168.0.1/24 configure this routers DHCP for this network
R2 interface (1) 192.168.0.2/24
R2 interface (2) 192.168.1.1/24 configure this routers DHCP for this network
R3 interface (1) 192.168.0.3/24
R3 interface (2) 192.168.2.1/24 configure this routers DHCP for this network

All routers you would have to enable RIP, once the routers learn of the other networks you can now target any share by IP, but not see it (at least the other network). A WINS server should solve that problem.
The Wins server can be placed on any of the local networks we are dealing with 192.168.0.0 or 192.168.1.0 or 192.168.2.0 but all of the client computers must know where the server is so when configuring the DHCP on the routers for networks 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.2.0 don’t forget the WIN’s server address.


The above scenario is fairly ideal but like I said depends on your hardware.
In the example I went with three networks instead of two
when u say two interfaces, you're referring to lan ports and wan ports?

Quote:
Originally Posted by axegrinder View Post
Hey David
I’m having more questions than answers and just to give you a little food for thought (maybe or maybe not)
Subnet the network: most cases would be better control over network traffic if there is too much going on (traffic). You might want to subnet also just for topography (but not necessary) reasons 1st floor 2nd floor and 5th floor and as already said by CrossCech might want to keep departments isolated from each other accounting, warehouse, terminal services and so on. There is also a company has their own web server and wants to keep it on a separate network from the rest of the companies servers and workstations. But you also brought up about the two networks seeing each other’s shares. So I have to ask why are you thinking of sub netting? As far as the MS shares you won’t be able to see them on a different subnet, but it can be done.
Things I have to ask. How many routers, switches and clients? How would you implement this, what I mean. Is the network DHCP? How are you going to implement who is on what network? Or would the one network be static addressing (which would be fine). So kind of need to know your hardware situation a little better. A fair amount of ways to go about it.

A few situations, nothing is in stone and other people can have better ideas.
Going to assume there is a router in place for internet (call it R1) and also going to ASSUME it has two interfaces (internet and your place of business) you want 2 networks basically. You could get two more routers (both going to R1) one to address each network (or subnetwork) this can be two fold because it can also take care of addressing for each network since most routers have DHCP.
So I like CrossCech’s method let’s just change the third octet in 192.168.***.***/24 scheme
R1 interface (1) (internet ***.***.***.*** whatever)
R1 interface (2) (Your office) 192.168.0.1/24 configure this routers DHCP for this network
R2 interface (1) 192.168.0.2/24
R2 interface (2) 192.168.1.1/24 configure this routers DHCP for this network
R3 interface (1) 192.168.0.3/24
R3 interface (2) 192.168.2.1/24 configure this routers DHCP for this network

All routers you would have to enable RIP, once the routers learn of the other networks you can now target any share by IP, but not see it (at least the other network). A WINS server should solve that problem.
The Wins server can be placed on any of the local networks we are dealing with 192.168.0.0 or 192.168.1.0 or 192.168.2.0 but all of the client computers must know where the server is so when configuring the DHCP on the routers for networks 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.2.0 don’t forget the WIN’s server address.


The above scenario is fairly ideal but like I said depends on your hardware.
In the example I went with three networks instead of two
when u say two interfaces, you mean lan port and wan port?

Why is it that you can't see the file sharing computers in my network? Is it because of different broadcast address?
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Old 05-22-2009, 02:53 AM   #16
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

Is the network setup below subnetting? Is there anything wrong with the setup below?

When I use this configuration, traffic in network A is segregated from network B. All computers can access the internet. Computers in network A can ping each computer in network B but computers network B cannot ping computers in network A due to NAT.

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Old 05-27-2009, 01:07 PM   #17
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Default Re: When do you have two different subnet?

Hey
To answer your question no you are not subnetting. What you have is some default class C networks. However even of you were subnetting an IP address it would not give you any advantages or disadvantages to what you already have. Did you check out http://www.ralphb.net/IPSubnet/ yet? Spend a little time with (subnetting) & (More Restrictive Subnet Masks). You need to break it down to binary.
Is that a DSL modem or a DSL modem/ router??
If you were to subnet the 192.168.1.0 network off the DSL I see a few different ways as it is right now you have 3 networks so keeping with that we will go with 4 subnets the new mask would be 255.255.255.192. And here is the breakdown.

As far as one network can’t ping the other yep that’s the NAT (probably). Go into your routers and see if they can do two things the first, can it be turned from a GATEWAY to ROUTER and also can the routers do “static routing”. Let’s just go from there.

One more thing can you give me the address and mask on both routers interfaces.
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