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Old 10-30-2008, 04:37 PM   #11
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Default Re: SERIOUS Question

We will probably only use half of the ports on the switch, maybe 8-10.

Can I just use a regular RJ-45 cable? Hold on, what is the name of the cable that most computers use to connect to their router/modem? Can I just use that cable? Or is a patch cable only needed to connect to the router from the switch...
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Old 10-30-2008, 04:43 PM   #12
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Default Re: SERIOUS Question

Then it might be cheaper to buy an 8-port switch and buy a second later down the road. Most routers have four switches so lemme just do the math here and see.

Four ports, one goes to an eight port switch so Seven computers could be covered with the one switch. That leaves the other three ports open to go to the last three computers In the event that you need more than ten, buy a second switch and put it somewhere in between the router and the computer.

As for the cable RJ-45 is the connector, on the cable. So pretty much yes, you can use that cable as it's the right kind of cable just not nessiceraly the right quality/speed. It's also commonly reffered to as Ethernet or network cable. It's true name is CAT followed by a number. Higher numbers have higher speed capacity and quality. The only difference between the CAT5e I suggested and the CAT6 is a little bit of quality.

As a side note about the router, I tend to shy away from netgear... I have better luck with D-link and Linksys...
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:28 PM   #13
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Default Re: SERIOUS Question

Alright cool, thanks to everyone who gave input!
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:29 PM   #14
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Default Re: SERIOUS Question

Grr, I just typed a reply and made a mistake and now it's gone :S

Cable wise, go for Cat6 or better. Cat6 handles gigabit speeds better, and is expected to reach 10Gb speeds. May not seem like a major issue now, but that's what people thought about 10Mb cabling 10 years ago. All in all, won't cost you more than 50$ extra to do Cat6, as it's became the standard for new cabling.

Switch wise, look for a decent 16+ port switch. I'd get one with at least gigabit uplinks. Something like this would be ideal, I've had two running for two years with only one crash http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833127222 The gigabit capability's really add alot of potential, as well as the ability to have add in cards to handle fiber links. Actually has some brains, so it can monitor itself for problems too and even report them. Many of the other features can come in real helpful like QOS and VLAN's, and it supports 802.1X which is the future of network security. Cheaper switches can erm, die when under heavy loads quite easily.

Router wise, you're going to want something beefy and not a consumer router like they sell at best buy. Not even some router running tomato or DD-WRT will suffice. What router to buy will depend on what you want to do with it. If your confident on doing something yourself, a small linux distribution called smoothwall will do nicely and offer you extreme performance and reliability (if the hardware you install it on is reliable) for the price of an old p3 era PC.

And make sure you have a decent "modem" if your running DSL / Cable. The crap your ISP gives you likely won't suffice.
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Old 10-30-2008, 05:35 PM   #15
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Default Re: SERIOUS Question

We don't need the fastest stuff...the internet only goes top speed at maybe 400kb/s, and nobody else really uses the internet but me so speed doesn't really matter that much.
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