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Old 08-14-2011, 02:39 PM   #1
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

I don't know how to explain this, but i'll try. When i'm playing an FPS like Crysis and i look left or right, it seems like some parts of the screen are ahead of others or overlapping a little bit. What is this called and is it normal? I can't record it and show it either. But i did edit this picture to show what it looks like. It's not actually a shot from my computer, but it's looks close enough. I just got this graphics card yesterday. It's a radeon 6870. The effect looks a little like this (though it's less noticable in game.) :




It's not as dramatic as the picture but close enough. It seems like some parts of the screen are ahead of others. But when i stop moving from left to right, the graphics are normal again.

I just figured out what it's called.. I think it's screen tearing . Anyways is this a problem with my graphics card? Like i said i just got it yesterday.
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Old 08-14-2011, 02:58 PM   #2
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

"The artifact occurs when the video feed sent to the device isn't in sync with the display's refresh, be it due to non-matching refresh rates, or simply lack of sync between the two. During video motion, screen tearing creates a torn look as edges of objects (such as a wall or a tree) fail to line up" - from wikipedia

Prevention

The ways to prevent video tearing are dependent on the technology of the display device and video card, the software in use, and the nature of the material being shown. The most common solution is to use multiple buffering.

Most systems will use this function along with one or both of these two methods:

V-sync

Vertical synchronization is an option found in most systems, wherein the video card is prevented from doing anything visible to the display memory until after the monitor has finished its current refresh cycle.

During the vertical blanking interval, the driver would order the video card to either rapidly copy the off-screen graphics area into the active display area (double buffering), or treat both memory areas as displayable, and simply switch back and forth between them (page flipping).

Beam tracing

Some graphics systems support a function wherein the software can perform its memory accesses so that they stay at the same time point relative to the display hardware's refresh cycle. In this case, the software would write to the areas of the display that have just been updated, staying just behind the monitor's active refresh point. This allows for copy routines or rendering engines which have a somewhat unpredictable throughput, as long as the rendering engine is capable of "catching up" with the monitor's active refresh point when it falls behind.

Alternatively, the software could instead stay just ahead of the active refresh point. Depending on how far ahead one chooses to stay, this method may demand code that copies or renders the display at a fixed, constant speed. Too much latency would cause the monitor to overtake the software on occasion, leading to rendering artifacts, tearing, etc.

Demo software on classic systems such as the Commodore 64 and ZX Spectrum frequently exploited these techniques, owing to the predictable nature of their respective video systems, to achieve effects that might otherwise be impossible.

Note: These are quotes are from this page in wikipedia: Screen tearing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

If it is not screen tearing, then try lowering your settings on the game, hope this helps!
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Old 08-14-2011, 03:18 PM   #3
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

I'm also using HDMI and playing on my 32 inch Sony KDL 32EX500 HDTV, if that makes any difference. The refresh rate of the tv according to CNET is 120Hz.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 220racer View Post
"The artifact occurs when the video feed sent to the device isn't in sync with the display's refresh, be it due to non-matching refresh rates, or simply lack of sync between the two. During video motion, screen tearing creates a torn look as edges of objects (such as a wall or a tree) fail to line up" - from wikipedia

Prevention

The ways to prevent video tearing are dependent on the technology of the display device and video card, the software in use, and the nature of the material being shown. The most common solution is to use multiple buffering.

Most systems will use this function along with one or both of these two methods:

V-sync

Vertical synchronization is an option found in most systems, wherein the video card is prevented from doing anything visible to the display memory until after the monitor has finished its current refresh cycle.

During the vertical blanking interval, the driver would order the video card to either rapidly copy the off-screen graphics area into the active display area (double buffering), or treat both memory areas as displayable, and simply switch back and forth between them (page flipping).

Beam tracing

Some graphics systems support a function wherein the software can perform its memory accesses so that they stay at the same time point relative to the display hardware's refresh cycle. In this case, the software would write to the areas of the display that have just been updated, staying just behind the monitor's active refresh point. This allows for copy routines or rendering engines which have a somewhat unpredictable throughput, as long as the rendering engine is capable of "catching up" with the monitor's active refresh point when it falls behind.

Alternatively, the software could instead stay just ahead of the active refresh point. Depending on how far ahead one chooses to stay, this method may demand code that copies or renders the display at a fixed, constant speed. Too much latency would cause the monitor to overtake the software on occasion, leading to rendering artifacts, tearing, etc.

Demo software on classic systems such as the Commodore 64 and ZX Spectrum frequently exploited these techniques, owing to the predictable nature of their respective video systems, to achieve effects that might otherwise be impossible.

Note: These are quotes are from this page in wikipedia: Screen tearing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

If it is not screen tearing, then try lowering your settings on the game, hope this helps!
It is screen tearing. My card is a radeon 6870, my CPU is an AMD Phenom II X4 955 BE.

I'm using an HDMI connected to an HDTV, does that matter?
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Old 08-14-2011, 03:42 PM   #4
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

I'm not exactly sure, however I do believe that it is the T.Vs fault for the screen tearing, try using a normal computer screen if possible. I know that the radeon 6870 is able to handle crysis pretty well, so it is either the processor or screen
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Old 08-15-2011, 02:17 AM   #5
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

I would suggest reseat the VGA card and RAM, check the video cable running from the computer to the screen.

Also try another monitor.

If still the same problem, reset the mobo Bios default, reinstall the computer latest mobo chipset driver, reboot, then reinstall the latest video card driver as well.

Configure the screen in a lower refresh rate may help as well.

hope this helps!
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Old 08-15-2011, 09:11 PM   #6
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

Sounds like screen tearing to me as well. This could be either due to your graphics card not having enough juice for the settings of Crysis you are putting on (which is my suspicion) or it can have to do with your monitor itself not having a good enough refresh rate (60 hz, 58 hz, etc) and thus cannot keep up with Crysis properly in some areas at the settings you have it at.

If you are running your computer hot (IE not enough ventilation that your video card is dealing with a warm condition), then this can slow down your VGA's ability to process high end graphics and thus cause tearing as well.

Your ram is fine, and I do not agree with both the Ram comment above, nor the resetting of your mobo bios. These will have nothing to do with your tearing issue at all from my own personal knowledge and experience.
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Old 08-15-2011, 09:14 PM   #7
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Default Re: Weird Graphics Problem?

It must be your T.V screen, they were never meant for gaming therefore the manufacturers did not implement a high refresh rate. All of your components are good enough to handle crysis, and I do believe you have tried lowering the settings already, correct?
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