Go Back   Computer Forums > General Computing > Hardware
Click Here to Login
Join Computer forums Today


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-08-2017, 12:06 PM   #1
Beta Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: Germany
Posts: 1
Unhappy Water Cooling System

Hello computer-forum
Last weekend, I build a custom water cooling system for my computer, but it has a hole in the tube. So the water drips down on my graphic card. And now my computer shows me a blue screen. After this blue screen my pc goes down and I canít restart it.
I donít want to start my pc again at the moment, because I am afraid that I destroy my complete computer when I start it
I want to ask you, if it is possible that I can clean it or try to dry it for 2 days and it works again?
Thank you for fast support and good advices
__________________

__________________
Jeef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 12:22 PM   #2
Fully Optimized
 
AMD_man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Argentina
Posts: 1,636
Default Re: Water Cooling System

If your PSU has overcurrent protection them your card probably didn't suffer much. Try cleaning it and drying it and see what happens. Don't boot it again if it still has liquid.
__________________

__________________
"I so enjoy watching history warp as words pass
from the lips of one to the ears of another.
Imperfectly formed, half understood, poorly remembered."
AMD_man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 12:35 PM   #3
BSOD
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: US
Posts: 963
Default Re: Water Cooling System

Ah the perils of liquid cooling. Air almost never drips.
Give it a couple days to completely dry (putting a fan blowing across it helps). And check what you need to replace.
__________________
Technician is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 12:48 PM   #4
Fully Optimized
 
AMD_man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Argentina
Posts: 1,636
Default Re: Water Cooling System

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
Ah the perils of liquid cooling. Air almost never drips.
Give it a couple days to completely dry (putting a fan blowing across it helps). And check what you need to replace.
To be fair HSFs also have liquid.
__________________
"I so enjoy watching history warp as words pass
from the lips of one to the ears of another.
Imperfectly formed, half understood, poorly remembered."
AMD_man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 01:01 PM   #5
BSOD
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: US
Posts: 963
Default Re: Water Cooling System

Quote:
Originally Posted by AMD_man View Post
To be fair HSFs also have liquid.
Did you completely miss the point or you're just trolling?

The air itself has water vapor too, so what?
Have you lost components from Air cooling leaks?
__________________
Technician is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 01:14 PM   #6
Fully Optimized
 
AMD_man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Argentina
Posts: 1,636
Default Re: Water Cooling System

Quote:
Originally Posted by Technician View Post
Have you lost components from Air cooling leaks?
I never lost components to AIOs either. THAT is not the point.

The heat pipes on HSFs have liquid, not just vapour. That's all.
__________________
"I so enjoy watching history warp as words pass
from the lips of one to the ears of another.
Imperfectly formed, half understood, poorly remembered."
AMD_man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2017, 03:33 PM   #7
Fully Optimized
 
~Darkseeker~'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Welwyn Garden City, United Kingdom
Posts: 2,494
Default Re: Water Cooling System

It's unusual for a leaking custom loop to cause component damage. You're supposed to use either distilled water and an anti-fungal (e.g. PT Nuke) or other specialist cooling fluids that are non-conductive (e.g. nanofluids).

GPUs and motherboards both (usually, if they're modern) feature aggressive over-current protection that should stop you from blowing anything up.

Some fluids that claim to be anti-conductive just aren't, it's important to buy reputable fluid. If you're just using normal undistilled water in your loop, you've probably baked it! It's the impurities in water, not the water it's self, that are conductive.

Does your GPU have a backplate? Things like this are why backplates should be featured on ALL cards. if not, it's possible you've shorted something on the back of the card depending where on it the fluid landed.

I'd remove the card and place it somewhere dry for 24-48 hours then try it again. If your card has dual BIOS, it might be worth flicking it over as well.
__________________
EVGA SLI Micro Z68 // Intel i5-2500k @ 4.4GHz // 8GB Corsair Vengeance 1866MHz // Overclocked ASUS GTX 660 Ti // Corsair Carbide SPEC-03 // Kingston Hyper-X 120GB // 2TB WD Green + 500GB WD Black
#JC4PM
~Darkseeker~ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2017, 04:44 AM   #8
BSOD
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: US
Posts: 963
Default Re: Water Cooling System

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Darkseeker~ View Post
It's unusual for a leaking custom loop to cause component damage. You're supposed to use either distilled water and an anti-fungal (e.g. PT Nuke) or other specialist cooling fluids that are non-conductive (e.g. nanofluids).

GPUs and motherboards both (usually, if they're modern) feature aggressive over-current protection that should stop you from blowing anything up.

Some fluids that claim to be anti-conductive just aren't, it's important to buy reputable fluid. If you're just using normal undistilled water in your loop, you've probably baked it! It's the impurities in water, not the water it's self, that are conductive.

Does your GPU have a backplate? Things like this are why backplates should be featured on ALL cards. if not, it's possible you've shorted something on the back of the card depending where on it the fluid landed.

I'd remove the card and place it somewhere dry for 24-48 hours then try it again. If your card has dual BIOS, it might be worth flicking it over as well.
Distilled water does conduct electricity. At room temperature, it contains 10-7 M each of H+ and OH-. These charged particles conduct electricity. Of course salty water, with many more ions, conducts better.

---------- Post added at 02:44 AM ---------- Previous post was at 02:43 AM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by AMD_man View Post
I never lost components to AIOs either. THAT is not the point.

The heat pipes on HSFs have liquid, not just vapour. That's all.
Some do, some don't.
__________________
Technician is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2017, 07:56 PM   #9
BSOD
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 48
Default Re: Water Cooling System

I stopped using water for cooling ages ago. Modern components are being made so much more efficient that the need for it has passed. It was useful at one time when CPUs and GPUs were power hogs that got very hot with mild overclocking. Now for competitive overclocking refrigerants and gases are used instead of water and liquids and for most users the built in turboboost is more than sufficient for workflow optimization. Most CPUs can no longer be overclocked as they are locked and the enthusiast lines are built with turbo.

Make certain the system is totally dry (wait a few days) before powering up again and it may work ok for you.
Water doesn't hurt electronics, and in manufacturing they often get a water bath. It's water AND electricity that can kill components.
__________________

__________________
Alpha One Seven is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0