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Old 04-22-2010, 07:39 AM   #1
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Default system question

What determines if a system can be a 64 or 32 bit is it just the os software as long as you have the requirements i.e. ram, processor,etc.?
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Old 04-22-2010, 08:33 AM   #2
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Default Re: system question

Pretty much yeah.

The 32 and 64 'bits' refer to the size of the Data bus in the system.

A 64 Bit system will allow you to move double the information of that of a 32 bit system, and so will be twice as fast, but only at processes (like graphics, calculations, database work etc) Not things like basic word etc.

If you want a half decent system, 64 bit is pretty much the standard now adays, and for most new ish (last 3 years up to present day) systems.

32 bit is ok, if you are really on a tight budget, or just need a very basic computer, just for web browsing and light microsoft applications.

- a 32 bit OS will limit you to a maximum of 4GB of RAM in your machine (it cant write any more info than that at once, due to its smaller size bus)

- 64bit the sky is the limit pretty much (obviously theres a limit, but you arent gonna hit it unless you want to spend 100's of 1000's)

Pretty much everything is being developed now a days to be used with 64bit OS's too, and you can run 32Bit processes on 64Bit machines, but very few can do the opposite.

To answer your question, a system can be either, its just what suits you best as to which you pick. Just be aware the 32bit will bottleneck (Hold you back) your systems capabilities.
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Old 04-22-2010, 08:57 AM   #3
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Default Re: system question

Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke_Uk_Baggy View Post
A 64 Bit system will allow you to move double the information of that of a 32 bit system, and so will be twice as fast, but only at processes (like graphics, calculations, database work etc) Not things like basic word etc.
It's much more than double. 32-bit is 2^32 where 64-bit is 2^64. Essentially, you are multiplying by two 32 more times.

As luke mentioned the OS will play a role. If your computer is older than four years old there is a small chance the processor cannot support 64-bit.
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Old 04-23-2010, 07:04 AM   #4
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Default Re: system question

Now a days computers come with large hard drives; storage capacities range from 2GB or 3GB in the lowest-end systems to more than 16GB in the newest desktop powerhouses. And, they tend to function like filing cabinets; just as you don't climb inside a filing cabinet to work, your computer can't really work inside your hard drive. When you tell the computer to launch an application or open a document, it retrieves information from hard drive storage and places a copy of it (or a copy of just the portions it needs) into RAM. As a result, the more memory you have, the more applications and files you can work with at one time.

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