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Old 12-07-2005, 12:29 PM   #21
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

It depends what motherboard it is. Take a look at HighFSB, and ClockGen. You will need CPU-Z, or Everest, or something like that to find out what the clock generator is.
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Old 12-07-2005, 01:10 PM   #22
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

It's going to be best if u use an oc program made for ur mobo. So check the mobo manufacturers site.
Ofcourse it's best to do it from bios, but when going for big overclocks an oc'ing application is quite usefull.
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Old 12-07-2005, 02:04 PM   #23
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

No, when going for big overclocks its best to use the BIOS
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Old 12-07-2005, 04:17 PM   #24
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

Quote:
Originally Posted by prosser13
No, when going for big overclocks its best to use the BIOS
Well maybe.

But I know that 2 dudes who are one of the best overclockers in the world (made several world records, both with cpu's (super pi world record) and vid cards (3dmark03 world record and I think 05 world record too. I don't think they currently hold any of these records) And when they did the super pi world record they 1st used bios to make the 1st and quite small (well damn big but not even close to what they were aiming) oc, then moved into windows based applications.

Now I know that those guys know what they are doing, I'm not saying it shouldn't be done from bios, but I know that they didn't do it from bios.
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Old 12-07-2005, 04:45 PM   #25
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

ooo i want to see how this turns out.
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Old 12-07-2005, 04:50 PM   #26
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mammikoura
Dude what are u talking about?



Thats a liquid nitrogen cooler. (only there is no stuff in atm) There is lot's of ppl who is ln2 (don't as me where that 2 comes from) as their cooling. And so expensive that only the goverment can affor it? I'm sorry but that really makes me laugh. I can get 10 liters of ln for about 150€. Even I can afford it. Not if I'd use it all the time, but that 10 liters will last for many hours. And ln2 is ment to get huge overclocks, not for fulltime use.

I'm probably going to fix up an dry ice cooling someday, asap, but it might take alot of time.
well, wtf. thats awesome. but i had a convo with some people, and they were talkin about how only the government has the time and money to do it. but maybe that was way more quality stuff, hell i dont know.. but, thats awesome
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Old 12-07-2005, 05:43 PM   #27
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

well the main problem is the motherboard is from 1997...lol, it doesn't have any OC options :P
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Old 12-07-2005, 06:18 PM   #28
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mammikoura
Dude what are u talking about?



Thats a liquid nitrogen cooler. (only there is no stuff in atm) There is lot's of ppl who is ln2 (don't as me where that 2 comes from) as their cooling. And so expensive that only the goverment can affor it? I'm sorry but that really makes me laugh. I can get 10 liters of ln for about 150€. Even I can afford it. Not if I'd use it all the time, but that 10 liters will last for many hours. And ln2 is ment to get huge overclocks, not for fulltime use.

I'm probably going to fix up an dry ice cooling someday, asap, but it might take alot of time.
WOW! What a mess!
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Old 12-07-2005, 08:01 PM   #29
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

Ok some of you have mentioned oil will short out our parts. This won’t happen because the conductivity or continuity of the vegetable oil is .0004 ohms. And someone said that the water molecules in the oil will corrode the parts... well there is NO water in vegetable oil. Vegetable oil is a lipid (http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=lipid) and a lipid is hydrophobic which meant that it repels water molecules or any other polar molecule for that matter. But because water is polar meaning that the oxygen atom has a negative charge and the hydrogen atom has a positive charge, it will not be attracted to the oil witch has no charge what so ever.

Here is a link to follow to explain about lipid's

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipid
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Old 12-07-2005, 09:03 PM   #30
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Default Re: oil cooled computer!

Awesome Idea! I'd like to see that. Good info too. I actually read something about use liquid nitrogen for CPU cooling. I'll try to find it.

Heres the price one.

Q: How much does liquid nitrogen cost?


A: Liquid nitrogen is actually very inexpensive. Right now (October 2001) we buy it for about $0.20 per liter. That's cheaper than milk! The expensive part of using liquid nitrogen, however, is a dewar to contain it and other safety equipment (like gloves, tongs and safety glasses). Dewars keep the nitrogen cold but stay room temperature on the outside so you can pick them up. And dewars can cost hundreds of dollars. For more info on this, look at the question Containing Liquid Nitrogen.

Heres the CPU cooling question. This is Dry Ice. But I think its the same thing.

Q: Hi, I have a computer with an overclocked CPU, it gets pretty hot but i dont want to invest 100 bucks in watercooling. So.. Here's my qeustion:
Is it possible for me to cool my cpu using a block of dry ice?


A: Cooling your CPU with dry ice does not sound like a good idea. There are many problems associated with this technique.

1) Dry ice has to be bought, stored, and handled very carefully. It doesn't last all that long (it sublimates, boiling off carbon dioxide constantly). You can't touch it with your hands (wear extra-thick gloves, and keep water away!). You may be able to get some at ice-cream shops, but the cost may add up to more than $100 if you run your computer a lot like this.

2) You constantly have to add more dry ice -- it sublimates away all the time. Depending on the size of the chunk you put in your computer, you may have to replace it every few minutes. A 2.2 GHz Pentium 4 (a typical modern processor) dissipates 57 watts of thermal energy. The latent heat of dry ice is 590000 Joules per kilogram, meaning you'd go through the stuff at a rate of about a pound an hour. Overclocking only speeds this up. And it absorbs heat from the air and surroundings, not just the processor, so it disappears even faster.

3) In a humid environment, the dry ice will frost up. Water vapor will condense on the block of dry ice and make regular ice. When the dry ice sublimates, this stuff falls on your processor and motherboard, making it wet. Even just cooling off the components of the computer below the dew point will cause water to spontaneously condense on your computer parts. They may not work when wet (short circuits!), or the water may speed the corrosion of electrical contacts.

4) You need good thermal contact between your dry ice and the processor. Dry ice when it changes into a gas, makes a thin cushioning layer of escaping carbon dioxide around it. This acts as a thermal blanket, keeping more heat from traveling to the ice. You can push the dry ice against the CPU, but what will happen then is that you will get vibrations. Vibrations tend to shake electrical contacts loose.

5) Speaking of electrical contacts, cooling a portion of your computer down to very low temperatures and not others will create mechanical stresses in your computer parts (most likely in your processor). When stuff cools down, it shrinks, and when it heats up, it expands again. Cooling down only a part of your computer makes that part too small to fit nicely into the other parts. You may crack something or, more likely, just break some electrical contact somewhere. Small electrical components can be fragile!

6) You have to make sure not to run out of dry ice -- if you run empty, the processor will overheat very rapidly and stop working.

Water cooling is difficult -- you have to make sure there are no leaks and no vibrations introduced by pumps. It is (was) often used for large mainframe computers, but is not common on today's smaller units.

Our suggestion is to get a good heat sink and a fan. There is no limit to how much heat they can carry away -- air comes in for free, and the fan and heatsink are not that expensive (your computer probably already came with one, but you might want to get a better one). You may want to look at heatsink roundups on computer-related websites, but be forewarned about the quality of information you may find on the web. You can also slow down the processor again. Usually you can get more performance out of a computer by buying one later, as processors get cheaper and faster all the time anyway, and overclocking is just a really hard way to go about this.

For the site go here: http://van.hep.uiuc.edu/van/qa/secti...y_Really_Cold/
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