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Old 09-30-2012, 10:36 PM   #1
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Default Learning it Myself

Hello again forum.

Vaironl again with his stupid questions.
This time I decided to start, "dream building" a pc.

Specifically a gaming PC.
Because at the moment I'm still saving for a Gaming computer which I will use for of course, gaming, but also Computer Science graphic related stuff.

Now I know a thing or two about hardware, and actually I have asked this same question in a similar way before on this forum. Also, my dad knows about building computers but that was probably about systems that were popular half a decade ago.

I would like to learn on my own and increase not only my knowledge about computers but hopefully add to my Computer Science understanding.

So if I'm not incorrect.

I should look for

1.Processor
2.Mother Board
3.Graphics card
4.RAM
5.hard drive
6.power suply
7.case

Now, how can I know when a piece is compatible with another?
If it will all fit in the case?
If the power supply wont melt/blow up?

just a simple google search?

Thanks,

Vairon.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:14 AM   #2
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Default Re: Learning it Myself

Hi Vairon....your knowledge regarding computers is obviously very limited, but you're going in the right direction, by asking questions before spending money.

Your list omitted an optical drive. You'll need at least one.

You'll also need to decide on your budget. That's very important. Building a computer with a limit of $500.00, is entirely different from one with a $1,500.00 budget.

Gaming computers are the most demanding of all, and require a considerable cash investment, if you intend to build a viable machine.

Things like compatibility, PSU requirements etc. will require research, and asking questions, but first you need to establish the limit you wish to spend, or you'll just be spinning your wheels asking questions.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:35 AM   #3
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Default Re: Learning it Myself

This is a great way to do a "first build". All the parts that are in the kit work together and even ship together. Then all you have to do is put them together. I don't know what kind of computer you are hoping for, but you should be able to find one to fit your needs.

Barebone, Barebones, Barebone Computer System Kit, Barebone Kits, PC Barebones, Asus Barebone Kits, Barebone PC, Shuttle Barebone Kits. Mini Barebone PC at TigerDirect.com


You'll also need to think about the operating system you wish to use and how you intend on acquiring it.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:44 AM   #4
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Default Re: Learning it Myself

Kits are often a good way to go for a first build, but I didn't recommend it because he says he wants a gaming computer, and kits are most often builds for general use.

They'll still require decisions concerning the addition of video cards, which will often change the power supply requirements, and now we're back to compatibility, etc.

These are some of the reasons why I wouldn't suggest a kit for a gaming build.
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:10 AM   #5
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Default Re: Learning it Myself

If you are going to buy your parts first rule would be to try and purchase all your parts from the same computer store.

This way the store people should know which hardware parts are compatible with each other.... this should eliminate any problems you might encounter with compatibility.

Then depending on your budget the store will recommend the correct hardware for requirements and hopefully an upgrade path for later purchases if need to be.
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:12 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hameister
Hi Vairon....your knowledge regarding computers is obviously very limited, but you're going in the right direction, by asking questions before spending money.

Your list omitted an optical drive. You'll need at least one.

You'll also need to decide on your budget. That's very important. Building a computer with a limit of $500.00, is entirely different from one with a $1,500.00 budget.

Gaming computers are the most demanding of all, and require a considerable cash investment, if you intend to build a viable machine.

Things like compatibility, PSU requirements etc. will require research, and asking questions, but first you need to establish the limit you wish to spend, or you'll just be spinning your wheels asking questions.
Well...
That is the tough decision.
Not to take you guys into my personal life, but let's be realistic, we all have to help home.
I just started college and I'm working to help my parent pay rent, food, etc.
Not a lot of money drained there. But still limits my savings.

I was looking for YouTube tutorials and found a channel called, duncan333, he has builds from $500-3000
I don't remember if it was 3k or 2k but obviously it's out of my price range, considering that with this money I could buy a car,

I planned on building a $500 PC.
But after being recommended to buy something of quality I said to myself why not just built one for around $700-800.

Now the hard part, besides saving, is to find the best performance for that amount.
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:34 AM   #7
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Default Re: Learning it Myself

It's actually easy to find performance for that kind of money.

If money is tight, you can opt for an i5-3330 instead of the 3570K or even go for the FX-8150. AMD motherboards are generally cheaper than their Intel based counterparts.

For a case, virtually any modern ATX chassis will be compatible with all of your components. Same goes for the power supply. Just make sure that it is capable of providing enough wattage for all of your components. This is extremely important.

The only compatibility issues you could possibly run into is the motherboard, CPU and RAM being compatible. Moreso the motherboard and CPU. The CPU you choose will determine what type of motherboard you can use. Oce you pick out a motherboard, you have to pick out RAM.

When choosing RAM, go with a quality brand. I'm a fan of G.Skill myself but there are others. Memory speed is important. You wouldn't want to use DDR3-1600 in an AM3+ board because AM3+ CPUs natively support DDR3-1866.

For $7-800 you can build yourself a nice PC.
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:55 AM   #8
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I agree with Snappy,....if you must stay in that $700~$800 price range you'll need to consider an AMD cpu & motherboard. In my opinion, they are not up to the performance of Intel components, but are certainly reliable hardware, with reliable performance, and viable alternatives at a lower price.

I certainly understand where you're coming from. Been there myself, several times. By the way, Kudos to you for helping out your parents, that shows real character!!!

However, if I'm going to be honest with you, I'd have to say that building a gaming machine for $700~$800 these days is very difficult. Even a gaming computer in the $800~$900 range is considered the low end, and it won't be long before a graphics card upgrade would be required.

Perhaps you should consider something like this...

Gamer Dragon

Or, this...

Mega Special III

I'm not recommending any particular one. All I'm saying, is that companies like these, will generally be able to sell you a machine, that's guaranteed, and provide you with some support, for equal too, or even less money, than you could build it for yourself.

Then, when the day comes that you can afford about $1,200.00, (which is what you need for a decent gaming machine), you'll be ready to build it yourself.

Just a suggestion.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:06 AM   #9
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Default Re: Learning it Myself

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hameister View Post
I agree with Snappy,....if you must stay in that $700~$800 price range you'll need to consider an AMD cpu & motherboard. In my opinion, they are not up to the performance of Intel components, but are certainly reliable hardware, with reliable performance, and viable alternatives at a lower price.

I certainly understand where you're coming from. Been there myself, several times. By the way, Kudos to you for helping out your parents, that shows real character!!!

However, if I'm going to be honest with you, I'd have to say that building a gaming machine for $700~$800 these days is very difficult. Even a gaming computer in the $800~$900 range is considered the low end, and it won't be long before a graphics card upgrade would be required.

Perhaps you should consider something like this...

Gamer Dragon

Or, this...

Mega Special III

I'm not recommending any particular one. All I'm saying, is that companies like these, will generally be able to sell you a machine, that's guaranteed, and provide you with some support, for equal too, or even less money, than you could build it for yourself.

Then, when the day comes that you can afford about $1,200.00, (which is what you need for a decent gaming machine), you'll be ready to build it yourself.

Just a suggestion.
What if I told you that I just want to play video games like COD, Battle Field, and sometimes other similar ones.
I don't believe that does require extreme graphics but just to say that I will be playing video games like those for the time to come.
Would you still recommend the cyberpower's pcs?
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:18 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vaironl View Post
What if I told you that I just want to play video games like COD, Battle Field, and sometimes other similar ones.
I don't believe that does require extreme graphics but just to say that I will be playing video games like those for the time to come.
Would you still recommend the cyberpower's pcs?

The PC build that Snappy described as well as the pre-builts that I suggested would be great for games such as you suggested. However, if you decided to buy Crysis 3 when it's released in about 6 months, or even Sniper:Ghost Warrior 2, the machines we're describing would have difficulty, and you'd have to dramatically lower the visual settings.

I'm not trying to discourage you from building your own. Not at all, I'm simply saying that in this price range, you'd probably save money with a pre-built machine.

Why not price out all the parts, on a machine from CyberPower, or iBuyPower, and see what that will actually cost you for the exact same build. Perhaps I am wrong, but I think you'll find your cost will be a little higher buying the parts, and building it yourself. Just wanted you to be aware of that.
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