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Old 05-06-2015, 04:24 PM   #11
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

By default, the AMD cards (so I'm assuming also the NVIDIA cards) have a really weird fan curve, as in the fan sits at 18% until it gets to about 75C...

Perhaps the same is occuring here.

Download this:- Afterburner | MSI Gaming Series

It's primary purpose is as an overclocking tool... but you can use it to override the NVIDIA driver's control over the fan speed and set your own custom curve (same as EVGA precision really!).

you could also try slightly downclocking the GPU core and see if that helps. as has been previously mentioned, reference PCBs/reference coolers are generally a bit soggy when it comes to cooling (Hence why you end up seeing tonnes of different custom PCBs from MSI, XFX, Sapphire, EGVA, ASUS and the rest) with things like Twin frozr cooling and/or huge heat sinks and fans.

Bottom line is, GPUs will always run hot. my R9 270X will hit 80C running valley benchmark with a slight overclock on it. Point is though, it never goes ABOVE 80c, and R9s can operate at up to 90C reasonably safely as long as the VRMs stay cool (below 75C). Unless you've got some seriously optomised airflow and/or proper custom watercooling, you're going to see highish temps when gaming at high settings.

I've just checked on the GeForce site, and they state the maximum operating temperature is 98C. In terms of card safety and component safety, you're actually OK. Realistically though you might want to invest in a case with good airflow and a good bit of room beneath the GPU for the hot air exhaust into. also make sure that your case is actually exhausting the hot air and pulling in cool air, not just one or the other, or you'll end up with turbulence, hot spots and hot air pooling in the top of the case, raising the ambient temps.
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Old 05-06-2015, 04:43 PM   #12
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

Quote:
Originally Posted by ~Darkseeker~ View Post
By default, the AMD cards (so I'm assuming also the NVIDIA cards) have a really weird fan curve, as in the fan sits at 18% until it gets to about 75C...

Perhaps the same is occuring here.

Download this:- Afterburner | MSI Gaming Series

It's primary purpose is as an overclocking tool... but you can use it to override the NVIDIA driver's control over the fan speed and set your own custom curve (same as EVGA precision really!).

you could also try slightly downclocking the GPU core and see if that helps. as has been previously mentioned, reference PCBs/reference coolers are generally a bit soggy when it comes to cooling (Hence why you end up seeing tonnes of different custom PCBs from MSI, XFX, Sapphire, EGVA, ASUS and the rest) with things like Twin frozr cooling and/or huge heat sinks and fans.

Bottom line is, GPUs will always run hot. my R9 270X will hit 80C running valley benchmark with a slight overclock on it. Point is though, it never goes ABOVE 80c, and R9s can operate at up to 90C reasonably safely as long as the VRMs stay cool (below 75C). Unless you've got some seriously optomised airflow and/or proper custom watercooling, you're going to see highish temps when gaming at high settings.

I've just checked on the GeForce site, and they state the maximum operating temperature is 98C. In terms of card safety and component safety, you're actually OK. Realistically though you might want to invest in a case with good airflow and a good bit of room beneath the GPU for the hot air exhaust into. also make sure that your case is actually exhausting the hot air and pulling in cool air, not just one or the other, or you'll end up with turbulence, hot spots and hot air pooling in the top of the case, raising the ambient temps.
Thanx I added a pic of my case witch is a swith 810 full case I have
push/pull on my cpu and I have 1 exhaust on rear and them I have exhaust on top I have 2 front fans s bottom fan as intakes

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Old 05-06-2015, 04:51 PM   #13
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

It would ruin your looks (which would be sacrilege)! but it might be worth turning the radiator fans all the other way up (currently they look to be exhausting as the non-hub sides are facing down) which would push air onto the back of the card. Ideally you also want an instake (Hub-size towards the card) pushing cool air over the card from the front (front fans are usually intakes anyway). assuming their is nothing in the way, AF120s are better than SP120s for that job.
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Old 05-06-2015, 05:17 PM   #14
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

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Originally Posted by ~Darkseeker~ View Post
It would ruin your looks (which would be sacrilege)! but it might be worth turning the radiator fans all the other way up (currently they look to be exhausting as the non-hub sides are facing down) which would push air onto the back of the card. Ideally you also want an instake (Hub-size towards the card) pushing cool air over the card from the front (front fans are usually intakes anyway). assuming their is nothing in the way, AF120s are better than SP120s for that job.
I added a video please take a look and let me know thanx
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Old 05-06-2015, 06:04 PM   #15
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

I'd say from an airflow perspective you have more exhaust than intake, we'd call this negative pressure. (positive pressure being more intake than exhaust, and neutral pressure being exactly matched exhaust and intake).

Your exhausts are in the logical places (at the top, since hot air rises). I'd recommend changing the bottom fan to an intake and having the two angle-able fans blowing onto the GPU (with the bezel/hub side facing inward towards the motherboard). I'd have high static pressure fans (e.g. Corsair SP120) in the two front-mounted bays behind the front cover, and then high airflow fans (e.g. Corsair AF120) in the angle-able mounts.

Positive pressure is always the best (more intakes than exhausts) as this not only improves cooling because there is more cool air in the case, it also stops the exhausts from effectively 'sucking' through every tiny hole in the case, bringing with it lots of dust!
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Old 05-07-2015, 03:55 AM   #16
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

Just a thought, when you fitted the graphics card, did you remove the two blanking plates at the back of the PC so the rear of the card is uncovered?
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Old 05-07-2015, 06:46 AM   #17
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Default Re: Gpu liquid cooling

Yea

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