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Old 06-14-2005, 03:02 PM   #1
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ok, can you tell me all those little stuff on the motherboard. What are those stuff that looks like a battery? I also have a question what is overclocking?
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:07 PM   #2
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Default Re: explain

Sure. That metal battery you see on the motherboard is what keeps the bios memory in place with all your settings you've set in bios (del at bootup). Don't worry about this though. You shouldn't need to replace it in the motherboards lifetime, and if you do, its just a straight swap and doesn't do your hardware damage at all.

it can be used for example to reset the bios if you set a setting wrong and can't go back by simply taking it out for a couple of hours to wipe the memory on the bios chip.

Overclocking is basically where you push the system father than specified by the manufacturer. Most CPU's, RAM, and Video cards can be pushed a bit harder to work if you have a good system to back it up, though I wouldn't experiment without knowing what you are doing first.
It takes alot of eexperience for example to overclock a CPU and get a performance boost from it.

I hope this helps
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:10 PM   #3
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Default Re: explain

thanx alot kage. You helped the newbi lol.
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:13 PM   #4
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Default Re: explain

Hey, I don't mind
Everyone starts from somewhere after all.
I used to think that if that went you couldn't replace it, and that it was more important than it actually is (though the bios is important of course )..i can't honestly say exactly what I thought now...oh well...

Glad i helped!
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:16 PM   #5
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Default Re: explain

what is bios anyway? Is it the black screens that appears and you check stuff if they work.
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:17 PM   #6
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Default Re: explain

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kage
Sure. That metal battery you see on the motherboard is what keeps the bios memory in place with all your settings you've set in bios (del at bootup). Don't worry about this though. You shouldn't need to replace it in the motherboards lifetime, and if you do, its just a straight swap and doesn't do your hardware damage at all.

it can be used for example to reset the bios if you set a setting wrong and can't go back by simply taking it out for a couple of hours to wipe the memory on the bios chip.

Overclocking is basically where you push the system father than specified by the manufacturer. Most CPU's, RAM, and Video cards can be pushed a bit harder to work if you have a good system to back it up, though I wouldn't experiment without knowing what you are doing first.
It takes alot of eexperience for example to overclock a CPU and get a performance boost from it.

I hope this helps
I wouldn't say overclocking takes a lot of experience. Sorry but it's just with comments like that you'll scare people away for good. I mean lets say you've got a stock cooled CPU and want to get some more hz out of it.

Well all you need to do (lets say the system is Intel), is buy a decent HS which you'll need to check works with your mobo, then buy a decent fan and some thermal paste.

Follow the instructions for applying paste to your CPU (you should apply thermal paste regardless of overclocking or not anyway), seat down yer HS, clip on the fan, go into the bios and raise the FSB slightly... go into Windows, stress test with games and big apps etc. etc. and see if it holds ok, monitoring temps etc. and if all is well repeeat with increasing the FSB in small increments of say 5mhz, then go back in Windows, stress test.. if the system crashes etc. put it back to what it was when it was ok and there's yar overclock

Obviously for higher overclocks you'll need to squeeze some more power out, so raising the vcore (power of the cpu) and raising the ram can be done, but once you've overclocked without going too far you'll be ready for that stuff

Good case cooling is a neccessity as well but most modern PCs come with decent cooling. It's when you see sick overclocks that people use watercooling, or probably because they don't like the noise their fans make.
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:21 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shuai
what is bios anyway? Is it the black screens that appears and you check stuff if they work.

It's the Basic Input Output System... it's like the oracle of your PC, controls ultimately how all of your hardware is configured to run off your motherboard

Press del when your PC is booting up to get into it in most cases. Be careful though, don't change anything unless you know what you're doing.
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:26 PM   #8
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Default Re: explain

Yeah, but it prooves my point, you do need to know what your doing. You can't just raise the clock as far as you want, hoping its going to work. Theres the Vcore, and all that you need to look at too. Thats what I meant by experience. I for example know alot about PC's but I haven't yet tried to overclock my CPU. I've overclocked my graphics card (didn't do much) but not that.
I only have the standard CPU heatsink and fan which is useless though for it.

It also matters on the motherboard and CPU too Smurkey, some CPU's aren't unlocked (Means you can't overclock that easily), so you can't just raise the multipliers and FSB...

I'm sure with a bit of practise though shuai you could, and if you are realy determined to do it you'll learn quicker
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:41 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Kage
Yeah, but it prooves my point, you do need to know what your doing. You can't just raise the clock as far as you want, hoping its going to work. Theres the Vcore, and all that you need to look at too. Thats what I meant by experience. I for example know alot about PC's but I haven't yet tried to overclock my CPU. I've overclocked my graphics card (didn't do much) but not that.
I only have the standard CPU heatsink and fan which is useless though for it.

It also matters on the motherboard and CPU too Smurkey, some CPU's aren't unlocked (Means you can't overclock that easily), so you can't just raise the multipliers and FSB...

I'm sure with a bit of practise though shuai you could, and if you are realy determined to do it you'll learn quicker

Yes it's dependent on the hardware in your system, although I was referring to the point you made about needing experience to overclock. I can speak from personal experience that you don't. I had to get one of my friends over once to seat a HS and apply the paste etc. because I was quite frankly scared I'd mess something up if I did it myself. However, HE didn't seat the HS properly, so I had to do it myself as he went home, and it was much easier than I had feared.

A few hours after I had, for the first time (and unsupervised) put the paste on and the CPU and the HS and the fan I went into my bios and upped the fsb to 220, knowing that a 3.1 overclock from a 2.8 wouldn't hurt the system, and took it from there. I wouldn't say you need experience, in that sense. A few reads here and there on some overclocking guide and bobs your uncle really, as long as you're patient, take time doing things and think about what could happen if you did this or that.
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Old 06-14-2005, 03:49 PM   #10
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Default Re: explain

Yeah thats what I meant really.

I think i'm going to get a new heatsink and fan (AMD ones only cost about 20 to cool it about 17 degrees more than the standard one!) and then try a bit myself.

I was dissapointed with the overclock I could get with my grahpics card... not enough to notice, though usually you really need to push them to get more than a few frames per second. Its actually more exciting and you learn more overclocking a CPU.
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