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Old 06-06-2009, 10:03 AM   #1
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Default Breaking in computer

I've just built this new computer, and would like to break it in. I have been using memtest86 and Folding@Home. I've already got stuff to break in the video card (Folding@home does an excellent job of it) but I'm looking for something to break the CPU in. Does anyone have any suggestions?
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:31 PM   #2
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

You're "breaking in" your computer. . . Why?

Prime95 from GIMPS is a good one.

Orthos Stress Prime 2004 is another.
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:46 PM   #3
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

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Originally Posted by Atomic Rooster View Post
You're "breaking in" your computer. . . Why?

Prime95 from GIMPS is a good one.

Orthos Stress Prime 2004 is another.
it's supposed to make overclocking slightly more stable. I've had a friend break in another computer of mine, and it really did make it more stable.
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:47 PM   #4
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

It's BS. There is no such thing as breaking in a computer, it's not like a car, or the barrel of a rifle.
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:51 PM   #5
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

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Originally Posted by GibsonSGKing View Post
it's supposed to make overclocking slightly more stable. I've had a friend break in another computer of mine, and it really did make it more stable.
Interesting. I don't think I have ever heard of having to break in a computer. I've been doing this for some 20 years and never did that to any of mine.

If you seem to think it made a difference in your machine, more power to ya.
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Old 06-06-2009, 03:03 PM   #6
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

I burn test every new build to check cooling and reliability, but never as a break-in. This is the first I've heard of it!
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Old 06-06-2009, 03:42 PM   #7
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

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Originally Posted by worshipme View Post
It's BS. There is no such thing as breaking in a computer, it's not like a car, or the barrel of a rifle.
I agree. I've never seen any overclocking increase from any break-in attempts on a computer. There are no moving parts that require any kind of break-in procedure. The hard drives and optical drives don't need to be broken in either.
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Old 06-06-2009, 04:05 PM   #8
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Default Re: Breaking in computer

All you're doing is pushing the outer edge of the thermal envelope for the various chips/ heatsink interface. What it basically does is run the chips to excessively high temps in an effort to cause the thermal interface (thermal paste like AS5) to soften up and get in to the grooves and scratches on the chip and the heatsink surfaces.
It is an un-necessary risk to take
My way of checking is to complete the build and let it idle for a couple of hours doing nothing but routine house keeping chores like getting updates and indexing the drives.
Then I'll open several programs one at time until I have at least 10 open at the same time and all doing something. I watch the probe temps and the software looking at the winbond chip readings. The key there is looking for a difference of not more than 10 to 20 degrees F between the probe in the heatsinks and the internal temp readings of the various chips.
The thermal interface is critical to keeping the chips running inside the design parameters. Too much and it's a blanket. Not enough and the internal temps of the chips will rise to a point where you could have a thermal runaway which in most cases is fatal to a chip.

Letting it idle for a time then slowly bringing the temp up while maintaining a watchful eye on the temps and the differential between the chip and its heatsink in my book is a saner way to check your work.
Ram rodding the rig right after assembly can be fatal to a system. Think of your computer like a woman. Lots of foreplay. Then when the time is right go for the big finish.
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